The governing equation for the static transverse deflection of a beam under an uniformly distributed load according to Euler Bernoulli engineering beam theory is a GATE Aerospace Engineering Question 2012

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The governing equation for the static transverse deflection of a beam under an uniformly distributed load, according to Euler-Bernoulli (engineering) beam theory, is a GATE-Aerospace Engineering-Question-2012

The governing equation for the static transverse deflection of a beam under an uniformly distributed load, according to Euler-Bernoulli (engineering) beam theory, is a 
(A) 2nd order linear homogenous partial differential equation.

(B) 4th order linear non-homogenous ordinary differential equation.

(C) 2nd order linear non-homogenous ordinary differential equation.

(D) 4th order nonlinear homogenous ordinary differential equation.


By:Amogh

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The governing equation for the static transverse deflection of a beam under an uniformly distributed load, according to Euler-Bernoulli (engineering) beam theory, is a  4th order linear nonhomogeneous ordinary differential equation.

Euler-Bernoulli beam theory
Euler–Bernoulli beam theory (also known as engineer's beam theory or classical beam theory) is a simplification of the linear theory of elasticity which provides a means of calculating the load-carrying and deflection characteristics of beams. It covers the case for small deflections of a beam that are subjected to lateral loads only. It is thus a special case of Timoshenko beam theory. It was first enunciated circa 1750, but was not applied on a large scale until the development of the Eiffel Tower and the Ferris wheel in the late 19th century. Following these successful demonstrations, it quickly became a cornerstone of engineering and an enabler of the Second Industrial Revolution.

tarun101

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