The Eduladder is a community of students, teachers, and programmers just interested to make you pass any exams. So we help you to solve your academic and programming questions fast.
In eduladder you can Ask,Answer,Listen,Earn and Download Questions and Question papers.
Watch related videos of your favorite subject.
Connect with students from different parts of the world.
Apply or Post Jobs, Courses ,Internships and Volunteering opportunity. For FREE
See Our team
Wondering how we keep quality?
Got unsolved questions? Ask Questions

SOFTWARE-ENGINEERING10IS51-->View question

Software engineering

Explain product and process metrics in quality management in software engineering.


Asked On2019-05-18 14:47:27 by:iamprinceraj

Taged users:
RSHAH12psonika29neenu2Rohit498

Likes:
Be first to like this question

Dislikes:
Be first to dislike this question
Talk about this  Like  Dislike
View all qusetions
Answers
Home > Articles > Programming

Software Quality Metrics Overview
By Stephen H. Kan
Dec 20, 2002
📄 Contents

Product Quality Metrics
In-Process Quality Metrics
Metrics for Software Maintenance
Examples of Metrics Programs
Collecting Software Engineering Data
Summary
⎙ Print + Share This
Page 1 of 6 Next >
In this chapter from his book on software quality engineering, Stephen H. Kan discusses several metrics in each of three groups of software quality metrics: product quality, in-process quality, and maintenance quality. He also describes the key metrics used by several major software developers and discusses software metrics data collection.
This chapter is from the book 
This chapter is from the book
Metrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering, 2nd EditionMetrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering, 2nd Edition 

Learn More Buy
This chapter is from the book
Metrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering, 2nd EditionMetrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering, 2nd Edition 

Learn More Buy
Software metrics can be classified into three categories: product metrics, process metrics, and project metrics. Product metrics describe the characteristics of the product such as size, complexity, design features, performance, and quality level. Process metrics can be used to improve software development and maintenance. Examples include the effectiveness of defect removal during development, the pattern of testing defect arrival, and the response time of the fix process. Project metrics describe the project characteristics and execution. Examples include the number of software developers, the staffing pattern over the life cycle of the software, cost, schedule, and productivity. Some metrics belong to multiple categories. For example, the in-process quality metrics of a project are both process metrics and project metrics.

Software quality metrics are a subset of software metrics that focus on the quality aspects of the product, process, and project. In general, software quality metrics are more closely associated with process and product metrics than with project metrics. Nonetheless, the project parameters such as the number of developers and their skill levels, the schedule, the size, and the organization structure certainly affect the quality of the product. Software quality metrics can be divided further into end-product quality metrics and in-process quality metrics. The essence of software quality engineering is to investigate the relationships among in-process metrics, project characteristics, and end-product quality, and, based on the findings, to engineer improvements in both process and product quality. Moreover, we should view quality from the entire software life-cycle perspective and, in this regard, we should include metrics that measure the quality level of the maintenance process as another category of software quality metrics. In this chapter we discuss several metrics in each of three groups of software quality metrics: product quality, in-process quality, and maintenance quality. In the last sections we also describe the key metrics used by several major software developers and discuss software metrics data collection.

4.1 Product Quality Metrics
As discussed in Chapter 1, the de facto definition of software quality consists of two levels: intrinsic product quality and customer satisfaction. The metrics we discuss here cover both levels:

Mean time to failure
Defect density
Customer problems
Customer satisfaction.
Intrinsic product quality is usually measured by the number of "bugs" (functional defects) in the software or by how long the software can run before encountering a "crash." In operational definitions, the two metrics are defect density (rate) and mean time to failure (MTTF). The MTTF metric is most often used with safety-critical systems such as the airline traffic control systems, avionics, and weapons. For instance, the U.S. government mandates that its air traffic control system cannot be unavailable for more than three seconds per year. In civilian airliners, the probability of certain catastrophic failures must be no worse than 10-9 per hour (Littlewood and Strigini, 1992). The defect density metric, in contrast, is used in many commercial software systems.

The two metrics are correlated but are different enough to merit close attention. First, one measures the time between failures, the other measures the defects relative to the software size (lines of code, function points, etc.). Second, although it is difficult to separate defects and failures in actual measurements and data tracking, failures and defects (or faults) have different meanings. According to the IEEE/ American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard (982.2):

Answerd on:2019-06-17 Answerd By:rishabhshukla

Likes:
Be first to like this answer

Dislikes:
Be first to dislike this answer
Talk about this  Like  Dislike

You might like this video:Watch more here

Watch more videos from this user Here

Learn how to upload a video and start earning here

Home > Articles > Programming

Software Quality Metrics Overview
By Stephen H. Kan
Dec 20, 2002
📄 Contents

Product Quality Metrics
In-Process Quality Metrics
Metrics for Software Maintenance
Examples of Metrics Programs
Collecting Software Engineering Data
Summary
⎙ Print + Share This
Page 1 of 6 Next >
In this chapter from his book on software quality engineering, Stephen H. Kan discusses several metrics in each of three groups of software quality metrics: product quality, in-process quality, and maintenance quality. He also describes the key metrics used by several major software developers and discusses software metrics data collection.
This chapter is from the book 
This chapter is from the book
Metrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering, 2nd EditionMetrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering, 2nd Edition 

Learn More Buy
This chapter is from the book
Metrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering, 2nd EditionMetrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering, 2nd Edition 

Learn More Buy
Software metrics can be classified into three categories: product metrics, process metrics, and project metrics. Product metrics describe the characteristics of the product such as size, complexity, design features, performance, and quality level. Process metrics can be used to improve software development and maintenance. Examples include the effectiveness of defect removal during development, the pattern of testing defect arrival, and the response time of the fix process. Project metrics describe the project characteristics and execution. Examples include the number of software developers, the staffing pattern over the life cycle of the software, cost, schedule, and productivity. Some metrics belong to multiple categories. For example, the in-process quality metrics of a project are both process metrics and project metrics.

Software quality metrics are a subset of software metrics that focus on the quality aspects of the product, process, and project. In general, software quality metrics are more closely associated with process and product metrics than with project metrics. Nonetheless, the project parameters such as the number of developers and their skill levels, the schedule, the size, and the organization structure certainly affect the quality of the product. Software quality metrics can be divided further into end-product quality metrics and in-process quality metrics. The essence of software quality engineering is to investigate the relationships among in-process metrics, project characteristics, and end-product quality, and, based on the findings, to engineer improvements in both process and product quality. Moreover, we should view quality from the entire software life-cycle perspective and, in this regard, we should include metrics that measure the quality level of the maintenance process as another category of software quality metrics. In this chapter we discuss several metrics in each of three groups of software quality metrics: product quality, in-process quality, and maintenance quality. In the last sections we also describe the key metrics used by several major software developers and discuss software metrics data collection.

4.1 Product Quality Metrics
As discussed in Chapter 1, the de facto definition of software quality consists of two levels: intrinsic product quality and customer satisfaction. The metrics we discuss here cover both levels:

Mean time to failure
Defect density
Customer problems
Customer satisfaction.
Intrinsic product quality is usually measured by the number of "bugs" (functional defects) in the software or by how long the software can run before encountering a "crash." In operational definitions, the two metrics are defect density (rate) and mean time to failure (MTTF). The MTTF metric is most often used with safety-critical systems such as the airline traffic control systems, avionics, and weapons. For instance, the U.S. government mandates that its air traffic control system cannot be unavailable for more than three seconds per year. In civilian airliners, the probability of certain catastrophic failures must be no worse than 10-9 per hour (Littlewood and Strigini, 1992). The defect density metric, in contrast, is used in many commercial software systems.

The two metrics are correlated but are different enough to merit close attention. First, one measures the time between failures, the other measures the defects relative to the software size (lines of code, function points, etc.). Second, although it is difficult to separate defects and failures in actual measurements and data tracking, failures and defects (or faults) have different meanings. According to the IEEE/ American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard (982.2):

Answerd on:2019-06-17 Answerd By:rishabhshukla

Likes:
Be first to like this answer

Dislikes:
Be first to dislike this answer
Talk about this  Like  Dislike

You might like this video:Watch more here

Watch more videos from this user Here

Learn how to upload a video and start earning here

Home > Articles > Programming

Software Quality Metrics Overview
By Stephen H. Kan
Dec 20, 2002
📄 Contents

Product Quality Metrics
In-Process Quality Metrics
Metrics for Software Maintenance
Examples of Metrics Programs
Collecting Software Engineering Data
Summary
⎙ Print + Share This
Page 1 of 6 Next >
In this chapter from his book on software quality engineering, Stephen H. Kan discusses several metrics in each of three groups of software quality metrics: product quality, in-process quality, and maintenance quality. He also describes the key metrics used by several major software developers and discusses software metrics data collection.
This chapter is from the book 
This chapter is from the book
Metrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering, 2nd EditionMetrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering, 2nd Edition 

Learn More Buy
This chapter is from the book
Metrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering, 2nd EditionMetrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering, 2nd Edition 

Learn More Buy
Software metrics can be classified into three categories: product metrics, process metrics, and project metrics. Product metrics describe the characteristics of the product such as size, complexity, design features, performance, and quality level. Process metrics can be used to improve software development and maintenance. Examples include the effectiveness of defect removal during development, the pattern of testing defect arrival, and the response time of the fix process. Project metrics describe the project characteristics and execution. Examples include the number of software developers, the staffing pattern over the life cycle of the software, cost, schedule, and productivity. Some metrics belong to multiple categories. For example, the in-process quality metrics of a project are both process metrics and project metrics.

Software quality metrics are a subset of software metrics that focus on the quality aspects of the product, process, and project. In general, software quality metrics are more closely associated with process and product metrics than with project metrics. Nonetheless, the project parameters such as the number of developers and their skill levels, the schedule, the size, and the organization structure certainly affect the quality of the product. Software quality metrics can be divided further into end-product quality metrics and in-process quality metrics. The essence of software quality engineering is to investigate the relationships among in-process metrics, project characteristics, and end-product quality, and, based on the findings, to engineer improvements in both process and product quality. Moreover, we should view quality from the entire software life-cycle perspective and, in this regard, we should include metrics that measure the quality level of the maintenance process as another category of software quality metrics. In this chapter we discuss several metrics in each of three groups of software quality metrics: product quality, in-process quality, and maintenance quality. In the last sections we also describe the key metrics used by several major software developers and discuss software metrics data collection.

4.1 Product Quality Metrics
As discussed in Chapter 1, the de facto definition of software quality consists of two levels: intrinsic product quality and customer satisfaction. The metrics we discuss here cover both levels:

Mean time to failure
Defect density
Customer problems
Customer satisfaction.
Intrinsic product quality is usually measured by the number of "bugs" (functional defects) in the software or by how long the software can run before encountering a "crash." In operational definitions, the two metrics are defect density (rate) and mean time to failure (MTTF). The MTTF metric is most often used with safety-critical systems such as the airline traffic control systems, avionics, and weapons. For instance, the U.S. government mandates that its air traffic control system cannot be unavailable for more than three seconds per year. In civilian airliners, the probability of certain catastrophic failures must be no worse than 10-9 per hour (Littlewood and Strigini, 1992). The defect density metric, in contrast, is used in many commercial software systems.

The two metrics are correlated but are different enough to merit close attention. First, one measures the time between failures, the other measures the defects relative to the software size (lines of code, function points, etc.). Second, although it is difficult to separate defects and failures in actual measurements and data tracking, failures and defects (or faults) have different meanings. According to the IEEE/ American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard (982.2):

Answerd on:2019-06-17 Answerd By:rishabhshukla

Likes:
Be first to like this answer

Dislikes:
Be first to dislike this answer
Talk about this  Like  Dislike

You might like this video:Watch more here

Watch more videos from this user Here

Learn how to upload a video and start earning here



Lets together make the web is a better place

We made eduladder by keeping the ideology of building a supermarket of all the educational material available under one roof. We are doing it with the help of individual contributors like you, interns and employees. So the resources you are looking for can be easily available and accessible also with the freedom of remix reuse and reshare our content under the terms of creative commons license with attribution required close.

You can also contribute to our vision of "Helping student to pass any exams" with these.
Answer a question: You can answer the questions not yet answered in eduladder.How to answer a question
Career: Work or do your internship with us.Work with us
Create a video: You can teach anything and everything each video should be less than five minutes should cover the idea less than five min.How to upload a video on eduladder