FULL STACK CODING PROGRAM

JOIN OUR PROGRAM AND BUILD YOUR CAREER IN TECH WITH EDULADDER.


SAMPLES APPLY NOW HERE

Real Problems! Real Experts!

An unparalleled, New approach On creative thinking and problem solving.


The Eduladder is a community of students, teachers, and programmers just interested to make you pass any exams. So we help you to solve your academic and programming questions fast.
In eduladder you can Ask,Answer,Listen,Earn and Download Questions and Question papers.
Watch related videos of your favorite subject.
Connect with students from different parts of the world.
Apply or Post Jobs, Courses ,Internships and Volunteering opportunity. For FREE
See Our team
Wondering how we keep quality?
Got unsolved questions? Ask Questions


You are here:Open notes-->CBSE122018-->Operating-system

Operating system

How to study this subject


An operating system is a software programme required to manage and operate a computing device like smartphones, tablets, computers, supercomputers, web servers, cars, network towers, smartwatches, etc. It is a layer of graphical user interface (GUI), which acts as a platform between the user and the computer hardware.

Here are some of the functions of an operating system:
Memory management
Memory is a crucial hardware resource for any computing device. It is the memory that keeps the program running or stay active when not in use. Here, it is the operating system that directs memory resources to different computer programmes and handles memory management for uninterrupted experience.
 Processor management
If processor is the heart of computer, operating system is the brain. The operating system decides which process gets the processor resources when and for how much time. Moreover, it is the operating system that optimises processor for efficient performance.
Device management
Computer is a set of hardware and software resources. The operating system manages these resources so everything works without conflict. For this, a computer requires drivers so that the software communicate to hardware efficiently through operating system. It is the operating system, however, that manages device management.

Official Notes


Add contents here

Notes from other sources


Types of operating systems

Single-tasking and multi-tasking

A single-tasking system can only run one program at a time, while a multi-tasking operating system allows more than one program to be running in concurrency. This is achieved by time-sharing, where the available processor time is divided between multiple processes. These processes are each interrupted repeatedly in time slices by a task-scheduling subsystem of the operating system. Multi-tasking may be characterized in preemptive and co-operative types. In preemptive multitasking, the operating system slices the CPU time and dedicates a slot to each of the programs. Unix-like operating systems, such as Linux—as well as non-Unix-like, such as AmigaOS—support preemptive multitasking. Cooperative multitasking is achieved by relying on each process to provide time to the other processes in a defined manner. 16-bit versions of Microsoft Windows used cooperative multi-tasking; 32-bit versions of both Windows NT and Win9x used preemptive multi-tasking.

Single- and multi-user

Single-user operating systems have no facilities to distinguish users, but may allow multiple programs to run in tandem. A multi-user operating system extends the basic concept of multi-tasking with facilities that identify processes and resources, such as disk space, belonging to multiple users, and the system permits multiple users to interact with the system at the same time. Time-sharing operating systems schedule tasks for efficient use of the system and may also include accounting software for cost allocation of processor time, mass storage, printing, and other resources to multiple users.

Distributed

A distributed operating system manages a group of distinct, networked computers and makes them appear to be a single computer, as all computations are distributed (divided amongst the constituent computers).

Templated

In the distributed and cloud computing context of an OS, templating refers to creating a single virtual machine image as a guest operating system, then saving it as a tool for multiple running virtual machines. The technique is used both in virtualization and cloud computing management, and is common in large server warehouses.

Embedded

Embedded operating systems are designed to be used in embedded computer systems. They are designed to operate on small machines with less autonomy (e.g. PDAs). They are very compact and extremely efficient by design, and are able to operate with a limited amount of resources. Windows CE and Minix 3 are some examples of embedded operating systems.

Real-time

A real-time operating system is an operating system that guarantees to process events or data by a specific moment in time. A real-time operating system may be single- or multi-tasking, but when multitasking, it uses specialized scheduling algorithms so that a deterministic nature of behavior is achieved. Such an event-driven system switches between tasks based on their priorities or external events, whereas time-sharing operating systems switch tasks based on clock interrupts.

Library

A library operating system is one in which the services that a typical operating system provides, such as networking, are provided in the form of libraries and composed with the application and configuration code to construct a unikernel: a specialized, single address space, machine image that can be deployed to cloud or embedded environments.


Model question

Previous year question papers


Add contents here

Useful links


Add contents here

Editors




You might like this video:Watch more here

Watch more videos from this user Here

Learn how to upload a video over here