An ideal Brayton cycle operating between the pressure limits of 1 bar and 6 bar gate mechanical 2011

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An ideal Brayton cycle, operating between the pressure limits of 1 bar and 6 bar -gate-mechanical-2011

It has minimum and maximum temperatures of 300K and 1500K. The ratio of specific heats of the working fluid is 1.4. The approximate final temperatures in
Kelvin at the end of the compression and expansion processes are respectively
(A) 500 and 900 
(B) 900 and 500 
(C) 500 and 500 
(D) 900 and 900 



By:prajwalamv

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The approximate final temperatures in Kelvin at the end of the compression and expansion processes are respectively  500 and 900

 Ideal Brayton cycle 
At the end of compression, temperature. 



Barton Cycle
The Brayton cycle is a thermodynamic cycle named after George Bailey Brayton that describes the workings of a constant-pressure heat engine. The original Brayton engines used a piston compressor and piston expander, but more modern gas turbine engines and airbreathing jet engines also follow the Brayton cycle. Although the cycle is usually run as an open system (and indeed must be run as such if internal combustion is used), it is conventionally assumed for the purposes of thermodynamic analysis that the exhaust gases are reused in the intake, enabling analysis as a closed system

tarun101

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